Sunday, March 3, 2013

Stitch Removal

This past Wednesday Luke had an appointment with our pediatrician to have his stitches removed.  He wasn't nervous about the procedure AT ALL.  We had talked about it, prayed about it and he was completely at ease.  We waited for Dr. Chad and read through his Lego Sticker book...

... and then Dr. Chad came in and got ready to start.  In the picture below he's explaining to Luke what he's about to do and showing him the curved point on the scissors preventing him from cutting Luke's skin.

This is when everything went horribly wrong.  The minute that the scissors touched his skin Luke PANICKED!!! Like, full on freak fit panic. 

There was screaming, crying, breath holding, etc.  I tried holding him, but the doctor was afraid I was going to go into labor (hahaha) and so he tried holding him.  Luke's adrenaline was pumping and the doctor couldn't even hold him.  We tried bribery (stickers, lollipops, etc) and rational discussion. I even cut out two of the stitches!!!

After about 45 minutes, he called in the reinforcements... One nurse sat on the table and wrapped her legs around his legs, while another held his hand open.  Dr. Chad cut and removed the stitches in about 4 seconds and it was over.

He recovered well afterward and said that he'll still be friends with Dr. Chad, but it was a traumatic experience for us both (I MAY have shed some tears watching him be so scared).

His finger is healing nicely and we're being extra careful with hedge trimmers around our house. 

We got a treatment plan going for his eczema and I scheduled his 5 year and Mason's 2 year check ups.  They're scheduled to go on April 17th and who knows... we may have Griffin with us when we go!

1 comment:

  1. Just wanted to throw this out there: eczema is a manifestation of an allergy. Usually a food allergy, and usually dairy or gluten. When sources of the offending allergen are removed from the diet, the eczema clears up. :) Steroid, creams, and lotions only soothe and cover up the symptom; they do not address the source of the problem.